Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Neurological Disorders & Stroke and Neurooncology Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Dr. Sandro Iannaccone

San Raffaele hospital, Milan Italy

Keynote: New Technologies: A new era for Neurorehabilitation

Time : 10:00AM - 10:40AM

OMICS International Stroke 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Sandro Iannaccone photo
Biography:

Dr. Sandro Iannaccone is a neurologist who received his medical training at the University of Milan (Italy) and completed his residency in Neurology in July 1986 and further specialized in Neuropathology in 1992. Since 1989, Dr. Iannaccone has been working as a contract Professor of Neurology at the Medical and Psychological Faculties of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele of Milan. Dr. Iannaccone became Responsible of the Neurologic Unit of the San Raffaele Turro Hospital in 1999. In 2013, he became Director of the Neurorehabilitation Unit of the San Raffaele Hospital. Since 2014, Dr. Iannaccone is also the President of the Scientific Society entitled Association of Medical Rehabilitation Specialists of Private Hospitals (Associazione Medici Riabilitatori Specialisti dell’Ospedalità Privata). In a research point of view, Dr. Iannaccone is leading research and development of innovative rehabilitative strategies using new technologies based on virtual reality. He is also leading trials on new – pharmacological and non-pharmacological - therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Iannaccone has also been involved in investigations in early detection of neurological degenerative disease biomarkers through neuropathological, proteomics and PET studies.

Abstract:

Over the last years, there has been increasing developments of new technologies to provide solutions to the limitations of standard rehabilitation (drop-outs, limited evaluation scores, or physical limitations of therapists) to enhance learning following neurological insults. To this aim, virtual reality (VR) settings provide an enriched environment able to generate augmented multisensory feedbacks (auditory, visual and proprioceptive). These settings, involving the mirror neurons system, help patients to develop a real-time "knowledge of results” and "knowledge of performance”, favoring the physiological mechanism of reinforcement learning. Such innovative strategies can be applied directly in the rehabilitation of motor, cognitive and speech functions, as well as in chronic pain treatment. Moreover, standard or virtual reality-based neurorehabilitation can be potentiated through the concomitant application of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Indeed, the NeuroAD system offers the possibility of applying cortical stimulation during cognitive training. TDCS can also be applied on-line, during motor or cognitive rehabilitation. Moreover, as a portable device, it also brings the opportunity to the patient to be applied at home. Thus, the development of new technologies in NeuroRehabilitation is converging towards multimodal treatments offering the possibility of home-based monitoring.

OMICS International Stroke 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joshua K. Underwood photo
Biography:

Joshua K. Underwood, ABD is the Head Athletic Trainer at Vermont Academy in Saxtons River, Vermont USA and is currently pursuing his doctorate of athletic training at the University of Idaho. He has worked in in a variety of clinical settings over the last 12 years including semi-professional football, summer collegiate baseball, adventure camps, secondary schools, and orthopedic clinics. He specializes in treating regional interdependent dysfunctions, concussions, orthopedic injuries, and fascia with a variety of treatments including Positional Release Therapy, Primal Reflex Release Technique, and Mulligan Concept. Mr. Underwood’s primary areas of research have focused on the treatment of concussions with manual therapy and the treatment of regional independent causation of pain or dysfunction.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Due to the comparable somatic presentation and biomechanical nature of concussions, cervicogenic headaches (CGH), tension-type headaches (TTH), cervicogenic vertigo (CGV), and whiplash, it is conceivable that cranial and/or cervical-based dysfunctions can occur secondarily to concussions and increase somatic symptom presentation. Fascial restrictions found within cervical and cranial structures have been found to increase biotensegrital tensions along cranial nerves and vestibular systems; however, fascial release techniques like Positional Release Therapy (PRT) have been found to be an effective treatment in reducing symptoms related to CGH, TTH, CGV, and whiplash. The purpose of this study is to examine the post intervention effect of PRT in resolving somatic symptoms (i.e- headaches, vertigo, hyperacusis, and photosensitivity) associated with concussions in a secondary school setting. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: An action research study utilizing numerical rating scale (NRS) and post-concussion symptom score (PCSS) to measure changes to headaches, vertigo, nausea, hyperacusis, and/or photosensitivity pre/post PRT interventions. Findings: The participants in this study were of an active population within a secondary school setting. Statistically significant decreases in intensity of headaches, nausea, vertigo, hyperacusis, and photosensitivity were witnessed by outcome measures between pre/post PRT interventions. Conclusion & Significance: Patients suffering from symptoms associated with concussions may additionally be affected by cervicogenic and cranial-based fascial restrictions which exacerbates headaches, nausea, vertigo, hyperacucis, and/or photosensitivity. Findings suggest concussion patients may benefit from PRT in reducing somatic symptoms during their recovery.

Keynote Forum

Arshad Zaman

The Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds, UK

Keynote: Clinical fMRI: From clinic to beyond

Time : 11:20-12:05

OMICS International Stroke 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arshad Zaman photo
Biography:

Dr. Arshad Zaman is an experienced neuro specialist with over 15 years’ experience in developing and clinically applying functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) at international centers of excellence. Previous studies encompass a spectrum of clinical applications (epilepsy, oncology) to state-of-the-art applications (e.g. pain relief, mental health, brain training). Current commitments centre around further development and clinical utilisation of fMRI.

Abstract:

Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) is a state-of-the-art functional neuroimaging technique that measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow.

fMRI is increasingly playing a key role in providing a deeper insight into brain function and or functional brain networks. In fact, fMRI has matured over the last two decades from a research tool to a robust powerful clinical technique implemented in a wide spectrum of domains, from judicial, commercial to clinical. There are several new novel clinical applications of fMRI.

The session will cover an introduction to clinical fMRI, clinical and a wide spectrum of recent novel applications (in rehabilitation, neurobehavioural and cognitive disorders, neuropsychology, mental health and psychiatry). This session will spotlight what currently can and can't be done with fMRI.

  • Neurological Disorders | Neuro Degeneration | Cerebrovascular disorders | Spine & Spinal Disorders | Stroke and its Management | Neuro Radiology & Imaging techniques | Multiple sclerosis | Neuropsychiatry and Mental health | Neuropsychology & Behavioural Sciences
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Turki Abualait is a clinical researcher in neuroscience and neurorehabilitation interested in investigating the neurological  disorders at Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University (university of Dammam formerly).

Abstract:

Fine motor and manual dexterity  deficits are  the main  cause of  functional  disability  that  leave  stroke  survivors  with  significant  impairment  physically  and  psychosocially.  transcranial  direct  current  stimulation  (tDCS)  is  one  of  the  non-invasive  brain  stimulation  (NIBS)  novel  techniques  that  can  be  used  in  modulating  brain  activity  and  improving  functional  and  clinical  outcomes.  To  investigate  the  therapeutic  utility  of  applying  tDCS  in behavioral  functions in patients  with stroke, a 48-year- old,  left-handed  male  who  had  a  right-hemisphere-fronto- parietal  ischemic  stroke  suffering  from  cortical  sensation  deficits; asterognosis and agraphesthesia was participated in  30  sessions of sham tDCS  before crossover  to  30  sessions of  dual- hemispheric tDCS in a double-blind, sham-controlled single-case  study. Six weeks of daily sessions (5 days per week) with (2 mA,  20  min).  Direct  current  was  delivered  from  a  battery-driven,  constant  current  stimulator  (Magstim HDCStim stimulator,  The  Magstim Co., Whitland, UK) using saline-soaked surface sponge  electrodes (5 × 5 cm)  with anodal  tDCS placed  over ipsilesional  primary motor area (M1), and cathodal over contralesional M1. Functional  outcome  measures  were  assessed  with  grooved  pegboard,  box  and  block  test  (BBT),  action  research  arm  test  (ARAT), functional  dexterity  test  (FDT)  and  nine-hole  peg  test (NHPT),  in  several  times;  prior  stimulation  (T0),  immediately  post (T1), as well as 1 month (T3) and 3 months after the end of  procedure  (T4). Structural  and  tensor  diffusion  imaging  (DTI)  data  were  also  acquired  prior  (T0)  and  after  stimulation  (T1).  Slight  improvement  in  grooved  pegboard,  (BBT),  (ARAT),  (FDT)  and  (NHPT)  in  sham  was  noticed  in  (T1).  However,  with  real  dual-hemispheric  stimulation  all  findings  were  clinically  significant  across  all  times  (T1,  T3  and  T4).  Higher  fractional  anisotropy  (FA)  and  lower  diffusivity  of  the  corticospinal  tract  (CST)  positively  correlated  with  better  recovery  of  fine  motor  and  manual  dexterity.  tDCS  intervention  induces  not  only  behavioral but also and structural changes  in stroke.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Hamdy Ibrahim, Egyptian, born on 1/11/1975. Graduated from Department of medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Joined the neuropsychiatry residency at Ain shams university Cairo, Egypt from 2001 till 2003, finished my MD in neurology and got my doctorate by 2008. I have been assigned as lecturer of neurology and my main concern was in the field of NEUROVASCULAR INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY. Completed his fellowship in interventional neurology at ZURICH University, Switzerland as F.I.N.R. by 2013. Presently working as Assistant clinical professor of neurology, GMU University and GMC hospital, Ajman, united Arab of emirates (UAE) SINCE 2010. Have publications in many journals as OPEN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING (OJMI), The Egyptian Journal of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, the European Journal of Neurology, Neurology of India. Also a member of World Federation of Interventional and therapeutic Neuroradiology (WFITN), Member of ESMINT (European Society of Minimal Invasive NeurologicalTherapy). Member of European Society of Neuroradiology Diagnostic and Interventional (ESNR)

Abstract:

To study the ambulatory measured blood pressure (ABPM) profile in normotensive patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Patients and Methods: The study was designed as a case control study including 50male patients with mild cognitive impairment in the age group of 30 - 50 years old. The control group included 30 volunteers with no cognitive impairment and in the same age group (30 - 50 years old) and same gender. Mini-mental estate examination, office and ABP monitoring (ABPM) and brain MRI scans were done for cases and controls. Results: Thirty patients (60%) with MCI revealed a non-dipper blood pressure pattern. Sleeping systolic blood  pressure and sleeping systolic load were significantly higher in patients with MCI than in normal volunteers (p = 0.01). MRI brain showed more white matter lesions (WMLs) in patients with MCI than in normal volunteers; however, this didn’t reach significance level (p = 0.056). Conclusion: MCI in normotensive young adult patients could reflect an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring could be an essential investigation in young adult MCI patients. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Zulviqar Anwer, MD, has training and expertise in handling chronic disorders including cardiacs and emergencies on regular basis. His open and contextual herbal medicine evaluation model based on responsive constructivists creates new pathways for improving medical care. His model is based on years of experience in research, and evaluation of herbal medicines of Unani origins in hospitals of repute in the country and his private clinic. He has also been involved in teaching and training of younger medical students in herbal system of medicine at various hospitals and educational institutions. 

Abstract:

Severe case of known prognosis of acute ischemic stroke with right hemiplegia and complete loss of speech was successfully treated and significantly recovered. A 75 years old male with known history of hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was shifted from intensive care unit (ICU) with medical complications involving acute ischemic stroke, right hemiplegia and complete loss of speech. The patient was shifted after three days of admission in the ICU to the Unani Herbal Medicine Unit of the HNA Clinic, Bijnor. The diagnostics including Contrast MRI Stroke Panel of the brain infirmed large acute infarct in left medial fronto-parietal lobe involving corpus callosum. There were multiple sub-acute to chronic lacunar infarcts in bilateral frontal and parietal lobes. Moreover, diffuse cerebral atrophy was noticed. The pathological examinations of the blood revealed leukocytosis. However, the random blood sugar and lipid profiles were found to be within the normal limits as was the Liver function test and Renal function test.  On further examination, his temperature was found 102.7°F, blood pressure at 106/64 mm Hg, heart rate 140 beats/minute, and oxygen saturation at 93% on room air as noted on first herbal clinic’s visit. The pre-herbal treatment medicament included Statin, Ecosprin, Pantoprazole, Citicholine, Telmisartan, Amlodipine, Vitamin B12 and Doxofylline and injectable. All the medicines except Ecospirin, Statin, and Vitamin B12 were discontinued immediately. The patient was put on Unani medicine, Khamira Abresham Hakeem Arshad Wala, Arq Gao Zaban, Mau’l Asl, Dawaul Misk, Habb e ayarij in addition to Ecospirin, Statin, and Vitamin B12 in a defined dose regimen for all the medicines including herbals and non-herbals. The therapeutic plan and the dosage regimen continued for 4 weeks and the patient showed satisfactory recovery of speech. He also regained satisfactory movements of his upper and lower limbs in significant strength and quality. A detailed presentation of the case will be undertaken.

Biography:

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: We have shown elevated levels of p53 and active caspase-3 in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The main aim of this study is to examine the impact of endurance exercise training on the expression of p53 and active caspase-3 in the skeletal muscle of mouse with induced Parkinsonism.

METHODS: Sedentary control (SC), sedentary Parkinson diseased (SPD), and exercised Parkinson diseased (EPD) groups were formed; each consisting of 10 randomly selected normal albino mice. Chronic Parkinson disease was induced in the SPD and EPD animals using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTP/p). The expression of p53 and active caspase-3 was investigated, using immunohistochemistry, in the gastrocnemius muscle in each animal group.

RESULTS: Both p53 and active caspase-3 expression was significantly (p value < 0.05) reduced in the PD gastrocnemius skeletal muscle following endurance exercise training.

CONCLUSION: Our present data suggest that chronic exercise training reduced Parkinson disease-induced upregulation of p53 and active caspase-3 in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle. Thus, our study suggests that inhibiting p53 and/or active caspase-3 may be considered as a therapeutic approach to ameliorate PD skeletal muscle abnormalities.

Arshad Zaman

University of Leeds, Leeds, W. Yorkshire, United Kingdom

Title: Can we treat what we can't see? : Neuroimaging and mental health
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Arshad Zaman is an experienced neuro specialist with over 15 years’ experience in developing and clinically applying functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) at international centers of excellence. Previous studies encompass a spectrum of clinical applications (epilepsy, oncology) to state-of-the-art applications (e.g. pain relief, mental health, brain training). Current commitments centre around further development and clinical utilisation of fMRI.  

Abstract:

Functional magnetic resonance imaging or functional MRI (fMRI) is a state-of-the-art functional neuroimaging technique (non-invasive) that measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow. fMRI is increasingly playing a key role in providing a deeper insight into brain function and or functional brain networks. There are several novel clinical applications of clinical fMRI.  Indeed, fMRI brain functional imaging, can unlock the deepest secrets of the living brain, consequently plays a key role in modern mental health treatment and psychiatric methods (clinical and research). Recently, there has been considerable consensus that modern psychiatry practices do not take full advantage of new (yet matured) powerful science, e.g.  neuroimaging techniques.

The session will cover an introduction to clinical fMRI, clinical and novel applications in mental health. This session will spotlight what can and can't be done with fMRI in the context of mental health and identification and or treatment of psychiatric disorders. The session will address the key question, whether it is the correct time to inject state-of-the-art science into psychiatric practice.

  • Workshop on Autism

Session Introduction

Sharmila Alam

University of Calgary

Title: Autism Spectrum Disorder from Valproic Acid
Speaker
Biography:

I was a neuroscience researcher from 2006 to 2010 in  University   of Calgary. Before that I obtained M.Sc in Biochemical Engineering from the same university. I am a mother of two kids and now residing in saudi arabia with my family. During my research days I worked with animal models (rat and mice) of Neuorlogical diseases to look for potential treatments. I have several publications in different journals. My inquisitiveness to find out the hidden mechanism, hope to find a cause and cure that can improve the quality of life of millions of people and my passion for science keeps me going.

Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviorally defined brain disorder affecting approximately 1 in 150 children [1]. Autistic children exhibit impoverished verbal and non-verbal communication skills and reduced social interactions [2]. Several studies have shown that in utero VPA (valproic acid ) exposure may link to an increased risk of ASD, where, for example, it has been reported that the rate of ASD in the children of VPA-treated mothers may be roughly eight times may be larger than that of the general population [3,4]. The purpose of the study is to observe whether VPA can influence the speed of postnatal maturation in vivo and whether this can be associated with structural and behavioral characteristics related to autism. Methodology:  Although the effects of VPA have been tested in rodents for many years [5], only relatively recently it has been used to model ASD in rodents for studying ASD-like behavioural features such as social play behaviors. Findings: We found that VPA treated animals can exhibit gross cortical hypertrophy and a reduced predisposition for social play behavior. Conclusion and Significance: Structural and behavioral findings from this research suggests that alteration of the developmental time course in certain high-order cortical networks may play an important role in the neurophysiological basis of autism.

  • Special Session by Nikki Stang, USA

Session Introduction

Nikki Stang

Founder and CEO of My Traumatic Brain Injury

Title: My TBI Story
Speaker
Biography:

I'm Nikki Stang and I suffered a traumatic brain injury in 2011, when I was 23 years old. It took over my life, and I have been fighting to get it back ever since. I was playing basketball with my students and I was accidentally headbutted in the mouth. I fractured my jaw, and eventually lost my front tooth. My life went on a downward spiral from that moment on.

Abstract:

 In 2011 I suffered a traumatic brain injury while playing basketball with my P.E. students. Living with a Traumatic Brain Injury turned my life into something I never expected. It is full of ups, downs, sorrow, pain, joy, and everything in between. Like everyone else, I have faced many hurdles over the years however, I wasn’t sure I would live to tell this particular tale. I made a promise to myself that one day I would share my story and I wouldn’t hold anything back. I have written everything as I remember it (the good, the bad, and the ugly) in hopes that it will find someone in need. Some parts may have adult content and/or profanity